Editors letter – Green Magazine Online http://greenmagazineonline.com/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 12:15:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://greenmagazineonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon.png Editors letter – Green Magazine Online http://greenmagazineonline.com/ 32 32 Letter from Ms Editors: Feminists have long fought for access to abortion – and we’re not stopping now https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-ms-editors-feminists-have-long-fought-for-access-to-abortion-and-were-not-stopping-now/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 14:59:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-ms-editors-feminists-have-long-fought-for-access-to-abortion-and-were-not-stopping-now/ The struggles, setbacks and gains of the past 49 years have only strengthened and better positioned the feminist movement to take on this fight. The unthinkable happened: the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, taking away a fundamental constitutional right of women and sending shock waves across the country and the world. Let’s […]]]>

The struggles, setbacks and gains of the past 49 years have only strengthened and better positioned the feminist movement to take on this fight.

The unthinkable happened: the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, taking away a fundamental constitutional right of women and sending shock waves across the country and the world. Let’s be clear: the Court and the Republican legislators and governors enacting harsh abortion bans and restrictions have no public mandate.

Across the country, at rallies and demonstrations in Washington, DC, and in every state, red or blue, the Court’s decision was met with outrage and with a deep determination to fight back. The women don’t come back. Millions of women – approximately one in four women in the United States – have had abortions and know how important access to safe abortion has been to their lives. The fight for abortion is a fight for self-determination, dignity and autonomy. And make no mistake, we will not give up this fight.

This is not the first time the women’s movement has engaged in this battle, having organized and won hard-fought changes to abortion laws in a number of states in the 1960s and early 1960s. 1970, even before the Court’s decision in 1973. Roe vs. Wade decision.

In the very first issue of M/s. in 1972, 53 well-known American women signed a petition calling for the repeal of abortion laws and declaring that they had had abortions, despite legislation in most states making the procedure illegal.

ms-magazine-letter-editors-feminism-abortion
The original article “We had abortions” appeared in M/s.

The feminist movement is bigger and more powerful today than it was in 1973, and the struggles, setbacks and gains of the past 49 years have only strengthened and better positioned the movement to take on this fight. . Additionally, the availability of medical abortion — abortion pills that can be delivered to your mailbox — has fundamentally changed the landscape of abortion access, even in states that have bans in place.

This latest attempt to control women’s lives and roll back women’s progress will not hold. Unlike 49 years ago, women wield enormous political power. The gender gap – the measurable difference between women and men in public opinion polls and in votes – has widened dramatically, and by November’s midterms is likely to shape the result of local, state and national contests, favoring contestants who support women’s equality and abortion rights.

In a CBS News/YouGov poll conducted within a week of the court ruling, 67% of women versus 51% of men disapproved of the reversal. deer, and women were much more likely to be angry with the Court’s decision (52%) than men (39%). And the women say the decision made their vote more likely.

Support for feminism is at the root of the gender gap: more women than ever describe themselves as ‘feminists’ – 61%, according to the latest Pew Research poll, including solid majorities of all generations, races and levels of education. Among younger women (aged 18-29), an even higher percentage of 68% identify as feminist, proof that feminism is still a growing movement and a potential force for change.

And there’s the power of women’s collective rage, as shown in artist Barbara Kruger’s 1992 cover for M/s. soon after, Anita Hill testified in nationally televised hearings about the sexual harassment she suffered at the hands of current Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas (see “Last Words” on page 48). We must work to organize and channel the rage unleashed by the Court deer reversal to ensure women’s voices are heard at the polls in November. That means overcoming voter suppression laws that particularly target black and Latino communities and young people.

ms-magazine-letter-editors-feminism-abortion
Mrs., January/February 1992.

With larger majorities of pro-equality members in Congress, not only can we restore abortion rights, but we can finally enshrine the Equal Rights Amendment in the U.S. Constitution, ensuring a permanent national safety net for women’s rights.

Turning women’s rage into real gains will take sustained effort. We are already seeing massive organizing efforts by feminists to pass state laws and constitutional amendments guaranteeing the right to abortion; bring lawsuits challenging abortion restrictions as violations of state constitutions; provide support and funding for women and pregnant women who must travel from abortion-banned states to access health care; and providing information and access to medical abortion, regardless of where a person lives. It is impossible to stop the movement.

As we begin this final battle in the long struggle for full equality—and for our very democracy—we, at M/s. promise to be a trusted source of accurate, timely and actionable information in print, online and through the acclaimed podcasts and programs of M/s. Studios. We will rise to this historic challenge and together we will chart the course.

For equality,

Katherine Spillar, Eleanor Smeal and the editors of M/s.

This letter originally appeared in the Summer 2022 issue of Mrs.Become a member today to read more stories like this in print and through our app.

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70th anniversary Ireland hosts https://greenmagazineonline.com/70th-anniversary-ireland-hosts/ Thu, 19 May 2022 15:34:28 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/70th-anniversary-ireland-hosts/ Take a look at the letter from the editor inside Ireland from the 70th anniversary issue of Welcomes. Available now in newsstands across North America and Canada! Ireland of the Welcomes is proud to mark a milestone in its publication hailing its 70th anniversary as Ireland’s leading magazine of interest. Since May 1952, Ireland of […]]]>

Take a look at the letter from the editor inside Ireland from the 70th anniversary issue of Welcomes. Available now in newsstands across North America and Canada!

Ireland of the Welcomes is proud to mark a milestone in its publication hailing its 70th anniversary as Ireland’s leading magazine of interest. Since May 1952, Ireland of the Welcomes has been the main source of information for Irish tourism for generations, creating a truly spectacular legacy in its pages celebrating its history, tradition, culture and community with exceptional photography and inspiring text.

Welcome Ireland remains this constant companion of all Hibernophiles. In the 1950s, when air travel became more common, the idea of ​​developing Irish tourism began to take hold. In 1952 a government body, which was to become Fáilte Ireland, began publishing a fortnightly magazine to highlight the attractiveness and appeal of the Emerald Isle. Seventy years later, Irish Studio is proud to continue its work by publishing Ireland of the Welcomes.

Ireland copies of the Welcomes anniversary issue will be available from Barnes & Noble and newsstands across North America and Canada. Click here to find your nearest dealer.

The magazine became a mainstay for renowned Irish wordsmiths. In this issue, we feature works by poet Patrick Kavanagh, authors Brendan Behan and Sean O’Faolin, as well as artist Paul Henry and photographer John Hinde. These and other articles are for the first time in decades available to the public. Throughout our anniversary year, we will continue to publish these wonderful articles from our archives in Welcomes Ireland and on our sister site IrishCentral.

Travel in Ireland has changed over the decades. In the 1950s, Ireland of the Welcomes advertised pilgrimages and religious retreats. Of course, as they continue to this day, those with Irish family and ancestry returned to Irish shores and in 1953 the first of a series of festivals called An Tóstal invited all who love Ireland to go back home.

Looking at the transformation of Welcome Ireland over the years, we see how travel has evolved, as air travel has made it easier to get here and cars, trains and buses have allowed us to organize road trips around this small island. What’s wonderful to see is that even though so much in the world has changed since the 1950s, what excites visitors to Ireland remains the same.

Travelers continue to arrive to explore Ireland’s millennia of history, its rich culture and the lush and spectacular countryside with which we are blessed. In the Welcome to Ireland pages, we are pleased to reflect our readers’ inspiration to travel to our island as this magazine has done for seven decades.

While Ireland had its best year ever in 2018 for outbound tourism with 11.2 million visitors choosing to travel, the 2020 pandemic put an end to all our pleasures. However, as we learn to live with Covid, we are happy to see tourists arriving in Ireland again and Ireland of the Welcomes is delighted to continue to be a traveler’s guide as the world comes back to its rightful place.

Ireland of the Welcomes is a timeless publication, always expressing the true magic that every traveler hopes to witness. If we look at how the magazine was promoted in 1963 with the slogan “Ireland today is everything you ever hoped for, much you never dreamed of. Home Ireland is at next to be there. A magazine especially for those of us who can’t be there, but yearn to know what it’s like. It’s a feeling that still rings true for us.

However, today, as Welcome Ireland celebrates its anniversary, we look to the future while addressing the past. Ireland of the Welcomes was the favorite Irish magazine of your great-grandparents, grandparents and parents and now that fantastic legacy is in your hands, so keep your family legacy alive.

For 70 years Ireland of the Welcomes has been more than a magazine, more than a guidebook, it’s a trusted source of all things Irish, down through the decades, like an old visiting family friend every couple of months to talk about what’s wonderful. house and what you must see on your next visit. Ireland of the Welcomes looks forward to its next 70 years of bringing Ireland to our readers around the world.

-Kate

Click here and subscribe to Ireland of the Welcomes magazine today

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Letter from the Editors: Return of the Emancipator https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-return-of-the-emancipator/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 17:31:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-return-of-the-emancipator/ “I’m just not sure I would say if it wasn’t for black people there wouldn’t be any democracy at all,” Chris Wallace asserted in a recent chat with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist. Nikole Hannah-Jones on the now-former CNN+. The exchange said it all, crystallizing why The Emancipator needs to exist. Wallace, an affable white man […]]]>

I’m just not sure I would say if it wasn’t for black people there wouldn’t be any democracy at all,” Chris Wallace asserted in a recent chat with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist. Nikole Hannah-Jones on the now-former CNN+.

The exchange said it all, crystallizing why The Emancipator needs to exist. Wallace, an affable white man who thrived, unchallenged by his version of America – a mythology – highlights why the public needs an alternative to the fossilized ideas amplified by mainstream news media. Unknowingly, Wallace glossed over the abolitionist era and the mid-century civil rights movement, which propelled America toward a truer version of itself, just as our founders intended. Today, we’re launching a digital publication commented on the Black experience as we reimagine the nation’s first abolitionist newspapers and reframe the conversation about ending racism.

Just as 19th century abolitionist publications called for an end to black slavery, The Emancipator will amplify big ideas and solutions to achieve a racially just society. As we center the roots of anti-darkness, we will explore the intersections that entangle us all, regardless of ability, race, class, religion, or other ways of being. The insights shared will reveal how systems are created for some to win and others to lose, and what we can do about it.

We believe that historical context is often missing from everyday media coverage. As seasoned journalists, we fed the media machine that often doesn’t give enough slack for deeper digging. We end up with surface coverage following the same tropes, pandering to the attention and needs of established power at the expense of underserved communities who need information and analysis – to live. Given the difficulty with which the media struggled to accurately label the January 6 uprising, why does the media have such a hard time with the label “racist”? The division now gripping the country proves that we have yet to think about what our next steps will be: the path of the emancipator is about leveraging intelligent and incisive commentary from a range of voices that prioritize the humanity and justice above all.

This troubling tete-a-tete between Wallace and Hannah-Jones, a black woman and member of our advisory board, is actually eye-opening for our mission. Matching her mind-to-mind energy, Hannah-Jones said, “You can’t call yourself the greatest democracy and the greatest democratizing force in the country while violently and brutally suppressing democracy at home. And that’s what happened to millions of Americans.

Watching this revealed a uniquely American tendency to cover up, to mitigate the damage caused by racism to prioritize the comfort of the very people implicated by the racist systems and social norms that keep this toxic, fundamental force alive. Wallace suggested that keeping intact a heroic myth of returning World War II soldiers was more important than highlighting the dangers of racism that lingered in the country after the war. But this way of comforting leaves out much of the truth of the American experience, and that’s why the media conversation needs a shift.

What we know for certain: The 2020 police killing of George Floyd, sparking the biggest US social justice protest ever, and the revelations (for some) of the racial disparities of the coronavirus pandemic , urged more people to reconsider. While there are those who aim to destroy our country through actions like storming the United States Capitol to overthrow an honest and fair presidential election; decrease in voting rights; and oppressing the LBGTQ community, many more people across a range of differences want to know more, do more, and be better at the freedom project that is America.

The abolitionist movement was a multiracial movement whose greatest voices include: William Lloyd Garrison, a white man who published the anti-slavery newspaper, The Liberator, in our hometown of Boston; Frederick Douglass, a liberated black man who founded The North Star; and Maria Stewart, the black woman abolitionist and women’s rights advocate who informs our first “We Can Solve the Racial Wealth Gap” series. Let’s not forget Elihu Embree, a white abolitionist from Tennessee who founded the first Emancipator in 1820. By exploring the historical outline, we all have the opportunity to be informed by their ideas, energy and values.

Now we use black liberation as an entry point into fundamental ideas about freedom and democracy. Our role in contributing to the solution is to center deeply grounded, research-driven, and community-informed ideas to explore ways to stop racism from continuing to hurt. And we mean everyone, whether you are Asian, Brown, White, Native or Black. Our country is polarized by a perilous lack of context and depth that threatens the gains we have made to create an inclusive society. If we look at the continuum of progress, as well as the setbacks, we are encouraged that the challenges we face represent a moment in time. We have a chance to accelerate a paradigm shift by building a newsroom that ties racial justice to democracy as our priorities.

When the nation is pressured to live up to its ideals by reaching out to those underserved and abused by social policy, laws and norms, history shows that everyone benefits. As co-editors of The Emancipator, we stand in the service of emancipation – disinformation, ideological ignorance, oppression, servitude, extremism and hatred.

It is the time of emancipation. Let’s go.

Deb & Amber

Co-Editors, The Emancipator


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Editors Letter: A brush with Maricopa fame https://greenmagazineonline.com/editors-letter-a-brush-with-maricopa-fame/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 15:45:41 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/editors-letter-a-brush-with-maricopa-fame/ Justin Griffin In Maricopa Editorial Director (file photo) Talk about a juxtaposition. Victor Moreno, a photographer who sometimes lends his expertise to us here at InMaricopa, was at the Don Pearce Fire Station on Edison Drive to take photos of James Huerta for this month’s magazine cover. And while he was shooting Huerta, I was […]]]>
Justin Griffin In Maricopa Editorial Director (file photo)

Talk about a juxtaposition.

Victor Moreno, a photographer who sometimes lends his expertise to us here at InMaricopa, was at the Don Pearce Fire Station on Edison Drive to take photos of James Huerta for this month’s magazine cover.

And while he was shooting Huerta, I was taking pictures of Victor.

Victor has captured so many images of what matters to Maricopa both for our magazine and for other entities.

He’s the guy who photographs everyone and here I’m taking pictures of him.

It was truly a moment of creation.

In this month’s issue, we have stories about the two, who are as close to Maricopa stardom as it gets. Through their work, although in very different fields, the two men touched many lives in Maricopa.

Huerta’s story is remarkable in that he is a 64-year-old man who follows and often exceeds the efforts of men and women a third of his age. This guy is perhaps the closest Maricopa has to a superhero.

But all superheroes have their weaknesses. For a few weeks in 2020, it looked like Huerta may have found his kryptonite with a COVID-19 infection. The man who makes everything seem effortless has struggled to recover.

Speaking of overcoming hardship, Amalia Clark, owner of Molly’s House of Little Feet, has an interesting story we tell about the 10-year journey to open her nursery school on Porter Road.

Tom Schuman took the time to talk with Clark about how she made her dream come true.

Growth, commercial or otherwise, is a complex subject at Maricopa. Jay Taylor examines how residential growth must occur before commercial growth can follow. It seems like you can’t have one without the other.

And as part of our monthly InFocus segment, we talk with City Manager Rick Horst about jobs, growth, and how we might have some unexpected allies in the drive to improve State Route 347.

These are just a few of the features in this month’s issue.

Have fun and thanks for reading!

This letter from the editor first appeared in the March issue of InMaricopa magazine.

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Letter from the editors of Jameela Jamil: “Have we lived in a meaningful way? https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-of-jameela-jamil-have-we-lived-in-a-meaningful-way/ https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-of-jameela-jamil-have-we-lived-in-a-meaningful-way/#respond Tue, 03 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-of-jameela-jamil-have-we-lived-in-a-meaningful-way/ Marie Claire is supported by her audience. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a commission on some of the items you choose to purchase. The main priority of the guest editor this month? To make sure you’re okay. Hello. Bloody hell. It’s March again. It is such a joy to […]]]>


  • Marie Claire is supported by her audience. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a commission on some of the items you choose to purchase.

  • The main priority of the guest editor this month? To make sure you’re okay.

    Hello.

    Bloody hell. It’s March again.

    It is such a joy to be invited to cover the cover of Marie Claire United Kingdom and contribute as a guest editor this month.

    How are you? How are you? If you are still alive then you have already achieved a phenomenon, so if, like me, you have really evolved in all other ways (I barely brushed my teeth on some days) as a human being … c ‘is OK. You survived a pandemic. Top level turn out in my books.

    And now you have the chance to work on the next phase of your life. The one that started after we were all exposed to truths and value systems that we can never ignore again.

    Have we lived well?

    Have we lived in a meaningful way?

    Were we surrounded by the right people?

    Did we pay attention to the right things?

    Were we really going in the right direction?

    Were we happy?

    When we look back on our death beds, will we be happy with who we were and what we did?

    These are the questions that the last twelve months have flooded me. I am excited at the prospect of what we can become now that we are a society more open to the truth, more aware of who deserves our respect and attention, and more open to difficult conversations.

    Misogyny, racism, transphobia, ableism… these are all things we lean on to discuss. We are no longer so easily discouraged and silenced by the rolling eyes, yawning and outright gaslighting of the privileged who do this – who make us ashamed of not telling the truth, because it threatens their lives. position and comfort.

    Remember that the equality of the privileged is like oppression. We all need to face this feeling and look for ways to extend our privilege to others..

    We must share, care and protect.

    We need to fend for ourselves and help, even when we don’t know what we’re doing, and when embarrassing mistakes can arise (and I speak from experience.) We need to work every day to make progress and let go of our appetite for perfection. .

    We have to try.

    We have seen too much to return to the present situation. So now we have to move forward together, learn as much as possible, as fast as possible, and try to help each other when we fall.

    I’m so sorry if I sound drunk in this letter. I’m not. I just feel more than I know what to do with these days. Sometimes it is even difficult to know how to put it into words.

    But I hope you like this issue. And I really hope you are doing well.

    As part of Jameela’s stint as Marie Claire’s guest editor, we’ve got a whole load of online content for you, including Sense of Self-Love with Millennial Therapist Sara Kubrick, a discussion on managing your mental health in lockdown with comedian Catherine Bohart and a discussion of why time is up on Munroe Bergdorf’s social media abuse. Enjoy.


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    Norman Rockwell could have shown more diversity – if not for the editors (Letter) https://greenmagazineonline.com/norman-rockwell-could-have-shown-more-diversity-if-not-for-the-editors-letter/ https://greenmagazineonline.com/norman-rockwell-could-have-shown-more-diversity-if-not-for-the-editors-letter/#respond Sat, 24 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/norman-rockwell-could-have-shown-more-diversity-if-not-for-the-editors-letter/ Museum enthusiasts take a closer look at Maggie Meiners’ “Freedom of Religion,” an updated version of the Norman Rockwell original. (MONTCLAIR MUSEUM OF ART) Part of the power of Reimagining Rockwell at the Montclair Art Museum it is because he forces us to confront the narrowness of the representation in many of his paintings. But […]]]>


    Museum enthusiasts take a closer look at Maggie Meiners’ “Freedom of Religion,” an updated version of the Norman Rockwell original. (MONTCLAIR MUSEUM OF ART)

    Part of the power of Reimagining Rockwell at the Montclair Art Museum it is because he forces us to confront the narrowness of the representation in many of his paintings. But it’s also important to note that the narrow representations of Americans in Norman Rockwell’s work were not just the result of “the times” or his blind views. It was a formal policy.

    Currently on display at the Rockwell Museum in Massachusetts, a letter from the Rockwell editor to the Saturday Evening Post ordering him to redraw a painting he had submitted with an African American depicted in professional work. Why? The Saturday Evening Post’s long-standing policy, as the editor sternly reminded Rockwell in a letter on display in the museum, was that no African-American could appear in an illustration except in a submissive role.

    The white editors of the Saturday Evening Post knew the power of positive portrayal, and they banned it. Rockwell eventually left Post for Look magazine, where he was able to publish his iconic paintings from the first day of Ruby Bridges at an allWhite school in New Orleans and Klan killings of three civil rights leaders in Philadelphia, Mississippi.

    Keith hefner
    Montclair


    The Opinion section of Montclair Local is an open forum for civil discussion in which we invite readers to discuss city affairs, articles published in Montclair or previously published letters. The opinions expressed and published in this section are solely those of the authors and do not represent the opinions of Montclair Local.

    Letters to the Editor: To submit a letter to the editor, email letters@montclairlocal.news or email “Letters to the Editor”, 309 Orange Road, Montclair, NJ, 07042 (email is preferred) . Submissions should include the author’s name, address and phone number for verification. Only the name and city of residence of the author will be published. Montclair Local does not publish anonymous opinion pieces.

    Letters should not exceed 500 words and must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Monday to be eligible for potential publication in this week’s Thursday print issue. Letters can be edited by Montclair Local for grammar and style. While our goal is to publish most letters we receive, Montclair Local reserves the right to refuse publication of a letter for any reason, including, but not limited to, concerns about unproven or defamatory statements, inappropriate language, subject matter far removed from the particular interests of Montclair Residents, or available space.

    City center: Montclair Local also accepts longer opinion essays from residents aimed at generating discussion on community-specific topics, under our “Town”.
    Square banner. Town Square essays should not exceed 750 words and papers should be submitted to letters@montclairlocal.news at least seven days prior to publication.


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    Norman Rockwell could have shown more diversity – if not for the editors (Letter) https://greenmagazineonline.com/norman-rockwell-could-have-shown-more-diversity-if-not-for-the-editors-letter-2/ Sat, 24 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/norman-rockwell-could-have-shown-more-diversity-if-not-for-the-editors-letter-2/ Part of the power of Reinventing Rockwell at the Montclair Art Museum it is that she forces us to confront ourselves with the narrowness of representation in many of her paintings. But it’s also important to note that the narrow depictions of Americans in Norman Rockwell’s work weren’t just the result of “the times” or […]]]>

    Part of the power of Reinventing Rockwell at the Montclair Art Museum it is that she forces us to confront ourselves with the narrowness of representation in many of her paintings. But it’s also important to note that the narrow depictions of Americans in Norman Rockwell’s work weren’t just the result of “the times” or his blind opinions. It was official policy.

    Currently on display at the Rockwell Museum in Massachusetts is a letter from Rockwell’s editor to the Saturday Evening Post ordering him to redraw a painting he had submitted with an African American depicted in professional work. Why? The long-standing policy of the Saturday Evening Post, as the editor sternly reminded Rockwell in a letter on display at the museum, was that no African Americans could appear in any illustration except in a submissive role.

    The white editors of the Saturday Evening Post knew the power of positive portrayal, and they banned it. Rockwell eventually left Post for Look magazine, where he was able to publish his iconic paintings from day one of Ruby Bridges in an allwWhite school in New Orleans and the Klan killings of three civil right leaders in Philadelphia, Mississippi.

    Keith Hefner
    Montclair


    The Opinion section of Montclair Local is an open forum for civil discussion in which we invite readers to discuss city business, articles published in Montclair, or previously published letters. The opinions expressed and published in this section are solely those of the authors and do not represent the opinions of Montclair Local.

    Letters to the Editor: To submit a letter to the editor, email letters@montclairlocal.news or send “Letters to the Editor”, 309 Orange Road, Montclair, NJ, 07042 (email is preferred). Submissions should include the author’s name, address, and phone number for verification. Only the author’s name and city of residence will be published. Montclair Local does not publish anonymous opinion pieces.

    Letters should not exceed 500 words and must be received no later than 5 p.m. on Monday to be eligible for potential publication in that week’s Thursday print issue. Letters may be edited by Montclair Local for grammar and style. Although our goal is to publish most of the letters we receive, the Montclair Local reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter for any reason, including, but not limited to, concerns about unproven or defamatory statements, inappropriate language, subject matter outside of Montclair Residents’ vested interests, or available space.

    City center: The Montclair Local also welcomes longer opinion essays from residents aimed at generating discussion on community-specific topics, under our “Town
    Square Banner.” “Town Square” essays should not exceed 750 words and topics should be submitted to letters@montclairlocal.news at least seven days prior to publication.

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    Letter from the Editor: Welcome to the Future of 5G (Someday) https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editor-welcome-to-the-future-of-5g-someday/ https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editor-welcome-to-the-future-of-5g-someday/#respond Tue, 25 Feb 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editor-welcome-to-the-future-of-5g-someday/ As the diplomatic battle over standards and competition intensifies, and America’s 5G networks take faltering steps forward, POLITICO offers an in-depth look at the political and technical battles that shape this generation of communications. How did America overtake China, catching up with a powerful new player? Why is the White House talking about 5G, but […]]]>


    As the diplomatic battle over standards and competition intensifies, and America’s 5G networks take faltering steps forward, POLITICO offers an in-depth look at the political and technical battles that shape this generation of communications. How did America overtake China, catching up with a powerful new player? Why is the White House talking about 5G, but in seeming total disarray over its current policy? And if I see 5G ads during the Super Bowl, why is my phone still showing 4G on the home screen?

    Here is a quick guide to our Agenda package, The future of 5G.

    A truly global and interoperable network will require not only companies but also governments to agree on their standards and priorities, which means coordination between competitors and even different value systems when it comes to issues. issues such as privacy, security and costs. Special for this issue, we commissioned an international survey of consumers and IT professionals, the POLITICO / Qualcomm Global 5G Survey, to determine the position of people in different countries on some of the burning issues that their leaders will have to solve.

    Is anyone responsible? Just when the telecommunications industry needs the government to set rules, the government appears to be AWOL on 5G, with a crucial agency without a head and a promised wireless strategy trapped somewhere in the bureaucracy. John Hendel looks at the tangle at the top.

    So you want to use 5G. In fact, you can. A little. But where? We sent a tech reporter to verify the reality of how far 5G is and how far away. By Steven Overly.

    Q&A with Trump’s 5G Tsar. The White House now has a 5G Czar, but if you’ve heard of Robert Blair, it’s probably because he got involved in the House impeachment inquiry for something else entirely. Can he help surround the administration’s warring factions and push American interests abroad? John Hendel and Michael B. Farrell met Blair for his first exclusive interview.

    If you are curious about how Huawei got ahead of US telecommunications companies– and how the United States can get its mojo back – you’ll want to read analyst Elsa Kania’s take on how Washington’s telecommunications policy (and a perfect storm of trade issues) helped weaken our competitive position, and what could fix it.

    Plus, if you’re just catching up or curious about the bizarre details, check out our primer infographic on the what, where and “speed” of the 5G network. And one glossary terms that everyone throws at.

    —Stephen Heuser and Maura Reynolds, editors


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    Sports Illustrated February 2020 Editors Letter: Miami Super Bowl MVP https://greenmagazineonline.com/sports-illustrated-february-2020-editors-letter-miami-super-bowl-mvp/ https://greenmagazineonline.com/sports-illustrated-february-2020-editors-letter-miami-super-bowl-mvp/#respond Wed, 22 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/sports-illustrated-february-2020-editors-letter-miami-super-bowl-mvp/ The world has changed over the past half century. How does that give a breathtaking historical and cultural insight? As obvious as it is, it’s always fun to take stock of evolution. Especially since we have been thinking a lot here lately about what this magazine and this brand have been and where they are […]]]>


    The world has changed over the past half century. How does that give a breathtaking historical and cultural insight? As obvious as it is, it’s always fun to take stock of evolution. Especially since we have been thinking a lot here lately about what this magazine and this brand have been and where they are going.

    Take the January 20, 1969 issue of Illustrated sports. Joe Namath on the cover, following the Jets’ epic upset against the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III. The history of the game by Tex Maule, with hipster references from the era to the jet age and swinging nights on the town. Word housewife in the title of another story. An automobile ad touting power windows as a technological leap that will ease the physical burden of tucking into a mailbox and sending a letter.

    This particular issue of SI came about as we conceptualized the cover of our latest magazine issue: the February issue, released today, features a grouping of the nine living MVPs of Super Bowls played in Miami, including Namath. In some ways, South Florida is the unofficial home of the Super Bowl; this year’s game, at Hard Rock Stadium, is Miami’s 11th, more than any other host city. It was the scene of some of the most Super Bowl moments (the guarantee of Broadway Joe, the taking of Swann, the driving of Montana) and some of the strangest. As Michael Rosenberg shows in his cover story, the Super Bowl’s growth from football curiosity to the de facto national day can be traced quite clearly through the games played in South Florida, from Super Bowl II to LIV. .

    This push-pull between the past and the future resonates particularly at this time for SI. We are entering a new chapter in the brand’s 66-year history: this is our first issue as a monthly magazine. Things have changed since Namath’s Super Bowl coverage. Maule’s story was full of game and game-by-game details, the kind of information that is stale seconds after the final whistle, much less days or weeks later when a magazine is read. The new SI is no longer a vessel for news and recap. It’s an invitation to relax and enjoy thoughtful writing and beautiful imagery – you’ll find them both in Rosenberg’s story and in everyone around him in the February issue.

    There is a place in the SI universe – a huge place – for breaking news and timely coverage. You get it on SI.com, on SI social networks and with our expanding network of local team sites. It’s the new IS, the growing digital reach and the direction to go with a premium magazine.

    As for the magazine, you’ll see 16 issues in 2020, including the Swimsuit Issue and standalone premieres focused on football, NBA, baseball and the Olympics. You will see thicker, shinier paper that showcases our branded photographs. And you’ll see pages full of stories that have been synonymous with SI since 1954: in-depth reporting, in-depth profiles, in-depth investigative journalism, produced by the best writers in the business. These stories will also air on our digital channels with additional video content, along with many other digital-only features that match the storytelling and journalism found in the magazine.

    Like the Super Bowl, Illustrated sports is a living, breathing and evolving institution – always building and growing beyond what it was before. Thank you for being a part of this story, and please let us know what you think of the new SI.



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    Letter from the Editors: The Next 25 Years of WIRED Begin Today https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-the-next-25-years-of-wired-begin-today/ https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-the-next-25-years-of-wired-begin-today/#respond Thu, 01 Feb 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://greenmagazineonline.com/letter-from-the-editors-the-next-25-years-of-wired-begin-today/ First issue of WIRED, published 25 years ago this year, founding editor-in-chief Louis Rossetto said that “in the age of information overload, ULTIMATE LUXURY IS MEANING AND CONTEXT.” (All caps.) If anything, that simple observation rings even more true today. That’s why WIRED has always valued depth. We dig deep into our subjects, reveling in […]]]>


    First issue of WIRED, published 25 years ago this year, founding editor-in-chief Louis Rossetto said that “in the age of information overload, ULTIMATE LUXURY IS MEANING AND CONTEXT.” (All caps.) If anything, that simple observation rings even more true today. That’s why WIRED has always valued depth. We dig deep into our subjects, reveling in wobbly engineering details that other publications ignore. We think deeply about the future. And we form deep relationships with our audience, connecting them to a community of ideas and encouraging them to think more about the future they want to inhabit.

    For most of our history, our business model, primarily based on advertising, has rewarded this depth. Advertisers are eager to connect with our sophisticated audience, and WIRED remains the best way to reach them. But in recent years, this industry has proven to be fickle and tumultuous, and too thin a reed to hang our entire business on.

    That’s why we’re launching a paywall today, a business that rewards our connection with our audiences and will help us keep WIRED a home for unique, surprising, stimulating and sophisticated journalism for the next quarter century and beyond.

    Attentive readers may note here that as the voice of the digital revolution, we have followed Stewart Brand’s famous notion that “information wants to be free,” a statement some have interpreted to mean that no one should ever. pay for digital content. But read the rest of Brand’s statement: “On the one hand, information wants to be expensive because it’s so valuable,” he told Steve Wozniak in 1984. “The right information in the right place just change your life. On the other hand, information is intended to be free, because the cost of its dissemination is lower and lower. So you have these two fighting against each other. This tension persists today. Even though information has become cheap or free to distribute, we believe that quality information, based on quality reports, crisp writing and insightful information, remains valuable.

    By WIRED subscription, you can help us continue our legacy of new ideas, in-depth reporting, stunning design, and beautiful writing. The details are here, but in a nutshell: if you read four articles in a month, you’ll be prompted to subscribe to find out more. If you subscribe, you not only get unlimited access to WIRED.com and a printed subscription, you will also receive a Free YubiKey—An essential tool to protect yourself online. You will have access to a digital edition of our magazine, delivered fresh to your tablet each month. And when you visit us online, we’ll remove the ads.

    But the real benefit of your membership is that you make sure that we can continue to produce great stories and content. To this end, we would like to announce three new programs that we are launching with the paywall. First and foremost, we’re excited to introduce the all-new Backchannel, a home for our most ambitious long-running digital journalism. Our feature films are consistently the most popular on our site, which is why we are building a special house for them and doubling our investment in their production.

    Next, we would like to unveil our new Ideas section. WIRED has always prided itself on what we call mind grenades, vast and surprising ideas that change the way the world thinks. We are now dedicating a section of our website to posting the biggest ideas from the world’s most exciting thinkers, including Joi Ito, Director of MIT MediaLab, Magic and loss author Virginia Heffernan, Big chicken author Maryn McKenna, and Jason Pontin, former editor-in-chief of MIT Technology Review.

    Finally, we’re launching a whole new kind of story: WIRED Guides. They are definitive, authoritative guides to the most important topics in the WIRED world. Need an update on the state of drone technology? Don’t know the difference between supervised and unsupervised artificial intelligence? Want to finally understand how blockchain works? WIRED Guides have you covered, with insightful essays and links to great stories from WIRED’s unprecedented archives.

    For a quarter of a century, WIRED has watched the Internet rewrite everything about journalism and media: who creates it, what we expect from it, and how we support it. And yet, deep down, Louis’ central observation in our launch issue is as true today as it was 25 years ago: when simple information is cheap and plentiful, context and meaning are more valuable than ever. The paywall is refocusing our activity around this simple truth.

    A new WIRED


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